Upper School Course Descriptions

  • English
  • Fine Arts
  • History
  • Math
  • Science
  • World Languages
  • Electives

The most important and demanding tasks of this department are improving the reading, writing, and thinking skills of the students. To that end, the curriculum in grades 9-12 is designed to strengthen verbal achievement, enhance literary experience, and encourage analysis and written expression of the English language. A summer reading program, often in correlation with the history or science departments, aims at broadening student exposure to literature using an interdisciplinary approach. Honors English classes are extensions of the English curriculum at each grade level. These courses prepare students for English (AP) in the eleventh or twelfth grade. Students work at a more challenging level with higher expectations for reading, writing, analyzing, listening, and independent study. Students enter the honors curriculum by teacher recommendation based on superior grades and performance. The pace of instruction, expectations of breadth and depth in writings, and variations in summer reading and school-year parallel readings distinguish CP from Honors level. English 9 — English 9 is the study of the genres and involves extensive grammar practice. The main objective is correct language in self-expression with emphasis on composition. The writing of various papers (paragraphs, essays, or character sketches) is stressed. Vocabulary study is taken from the reading materials and aims at building a meaningful vocabulary for both written and oral use. English 10 — English 10 is a survey of world literature, excluding American literature, as students examine cultural aspects of both classical and contemporary selections to understand and appreciate diversity in world concerns and the commonality of cross-cultural themes. The literary analysis essay and the inter-disciplinary research paper are introduced. Grammar is applied as a tool for effective oral and written communication, and vocabulary study continues to increase precision in oral and written communications and in reading comprehension. English 11 — English 11 is a survey of American literature. The course is designed to broaden the student’s interest in language and literature through emphasis on vocabulary, Socratic discussion, and forceful, clear writing. Sentence building teaches the student to write more mature and varied sentences. Composition continues with essays and a major research paper using critical literary sources and writing techniques. English 12 — English 12 is a survey of British literature; however, for comparative purposes, students will examine relevant works from world or American literature. Emphasis is placed on developing a critical understanding of theme, and students are introduced formally to various modes of literary criticism. Grammar is reviewed as necessary; emphasis is placed on essay writing. A research paper of literary analysis is required for graduation. Advanced Placement Courses – English (11) Advanced Placement Language and Composition and English (12) Advanced Placement Literature and Composition are extensions of the English 11 and 12 curricula. Greater emphasis is placed on understanding various rhetorical forms, the historical development of literature and language, and analysis of content. Longer papers are assigned which involve mature and critical thinking. Additional supplemental reading is required, and the student is expected to sit for the advanced placement examination. Major research papers are required in each course. Click HERE for the English Course Sequence with Prerequisites

Advanced Art – This class is for students who want to improve their artistic abilities and discover new ones. All projects focus on the elements of art, the principles of design, and creativity. Advanced Art students are required to keep a sketchbook and are encouraged to keep a portfolio of their work. AP Art (2-D, 3-D, and Drawing) – The AP Studio Art portfolio courses are designed for students in grade 12 who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. It is an AP course and therefore considered a core class. AP Studio Art is not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. The AP Studio Art program consists of three portfolios: 2-D Design, 3-D Design, and Drawing. These courses correspond to the most common college foundation courses. To enroll in AP Studio Art, students must already have an established and well-developed portfolio consisting of work done in previous art classes as well as work done independently. Art Journals – Students will use the art journal format to share their thoughts and feelings through a combination of visual art and text. Student’s will be working on a variety of topics/themes throughout the year and will investigate and experiment with a wide variety of media and techniques. This is a hands-on art-making course. Attendance is very important. Ceramics I – All work is based on hand-building techniques: pinch, coil, and slab, with the exception of a small introduction to the wheel. Projects are designed to give the students direction, but enable them to interpret themes/techniques in their own way. This is a great class for students who like to work with their hands and don’t mind making a mess. Ceramics II is open to all students who have completed Ceramics I. Students will work primarily on the potter’s wheel. Types of pieces/topics include cylinders, pitchers, bowls, plates, platters, throwing off the hump, teapot sets, and throwing in sections. Ceramics II students are required to keep a sketchbook and create slides or a portfolio of their work. Independent Studio Art is based on teacher recommendation for talent, work ethic, and behavior. This course is completely student centered. It is designed to provide the opportunity for students to focus on their interest and passions – allowing them to explore particular disciplines or styles in depth and develop high quality art which may be submitted for AP credit. Portfolio Studio Art is open to all students who have completed Ceramics I or Advanced Art. Students are accepted into the class based on teacher recommendation for talent, work ethic, and behavior. Students will complete a variety of assignments that will challenge them as artists and will encourage them to experiment with new media and techniques. Varsity Band – Varsity Band is for the student who has a good performing ability and knowledge of an instrument. Upon recommendation of the band director, a student in 7th – 12th grade may enroll in Varsity Band. Varsity Chorus – The Varsity Chorus is Fayetteville Academy’s most advanced choir. The group will study many different varieties of music throughout the year and showcase their talent at several performances. Emphasis will be placed on reading music, understanding theory, developing listening skills, and learning about musical styles and composition. Whether you have been singing your whole life or are thinking about trying it out, you will enjoy this course. Theatre & Communications is open to all Upper School students in grades 9-12. This course focuses on both theatre arts and public speaking/communications, uniting the two areas with their mutual emphasis on communication skills. The theatrical curriculum deals primarily with storytelling and acting and the communications portion focuses on argumentative and informational public speaking and interpretation. This blending of subjects allows exploration of how the best and most memorable stories and speeches manage both to teach and delight. The course ultimately challenges students to extend their analysis skills from English to analyze their audience, evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses, and to learn techniques to help them improve as communicators, regardless of the rhetorical situation.

This department strives to provide a comprehensive survey that will give each student the broad base and informed perspective needed for studying history at the college level. Advanced Placement and Honors level courses in history will require students to work at a faster pace and more challenging level with higher expectations for reading, writing, analyzing, listening, and independent study. American Government (CP) – This study of the United States Government provides the student with an in-depth focus on the Constitution and Bill of Rights and each branch of the federal government in order to prepare students for citizenship and an understanding of how a democracy operates. American Government (H) – This advanced study of the United States Government provides the student with an in-depth focus on the Constitution and Bill of Rights and each branch of the federal government in order to prepare students for citizenship and an understanding of how a democracy operates. It also prepares students for the Advanced Placement program in tenth grade World History. Students work at a more challenging level with higher expectations for reading, writing, analyzing, listening, and independent study. World History (CP) – This survey course begins with a study of ancient civilizations and continues to the present century. It emphasizes the rise and fall of empires and leaders, the religions and customs of various people, and the interrelationship of nations in modern times. AP World History – Through a selection process based upon past performance and teacher recommendations, students in the tenth grade have an opportunity to participate in World History (AP). This advanced placement course provides a greater depth of content in World History from the Neolithic Revolution, 8,000 BCE to the present. Students must be able to read, write, and analyze concepts at the college level. College credit may be awarded to those students who are successful on the AP exam in May. United States History (CP) – This course is a survey of United States history from the colonial period to the present era. Its purpose is to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the political, economic, and social developments that not only mark our past, but also shape our future. AP United States History – Through a selection process based upon past performance and teacher recommendations, students in the eleventh grade have an opportunity to participate in US History (AP). This rigorous program is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with problems and materials in U.S. history. College credit may be awarded to those students who are successful on the AP exam in May. AP European History: Through a selection process based upon past performance and teacher recommendations, students in the twelfth grade have an opportunity to participate in European History (AP). This rigorous program is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with problems and materials in European history. College credit may be awarded to those students who are successful on the AP exam in May. History on Film – This course is a history elective offered to juniors and seniors; it may also serve as the fourth history graduation requirement for seniors. The purpose of this course is to examine and analyze United States history through the prism of cinema. Public Speaking (COM 231) – This senior course taught by FTCC instructors provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support and will be awarded 3 general education units of credit accepted by the UNC system and some private colleges. This semester long course must be paired with the FTCC Psychology course (PSY 150). Psychology (PSY 150) – This senior course taught by FTCC instructors provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon successful completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology and will be awarded 3 general education units of credit accepted by the UNC system and some private colleges. This semester long course must be paired with the FTCC Public Speaking course (COM 231). AP European History – Through a selection process based upon past performance and teacher recommendations, seniors may enroll in this course. The emphasis is given to political, economic, and social developments in Europe from 1450 to the present, including assignments that require critical essays and analyses of problems and changes occurring in each period. College credit may be awarded to those students who are successful on the AP exam in May. In addition we offer alternative on-line courses through FuelEd and Virtual High School (VHS) for an added fee. These courses require approval from the Head of Upper School and Department Chair. Click HERE for History Course Sequence with Prerequisites.

Mathematics in grades 9-12 is a sequential, college preparatory program. It emphasizes the development of math concepts, as well as computational, problem solving, and critical thinking skills. Comprehensive and appropriately challenging, this curriculum is designed to provide students with the math background necessary for their future endeavors. Algebra I (CP) – This course is offered to students who have completed pre-algebra. Topics covered include variable expressions, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations, factoring polynomials, and simplifying radial and rational expressions. The interpretation and solution of verbal problems follows each topic. Students are introduced to graphing calculator technology. Algebra I (H) – This course is offered to students who have completed pre-algebra and display strong mathematical skills. Topics covered include variable expressions, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, systems of linear and non-linear equations, factoring polynomials, and simplifying radical and rational expressions. The interpretation and solution of verbal problems is incorporated within each skill area. Inquiry-based learning and graphing calculator technology are both utilized in this course. Students are encouraged to develop precise and accurate habits of mathematical expression. Geometry (CP) –This course follows Algebra I. Postulates, theorems, definitions and algebraic properties are studied. Students are exposed to deductive reasoning and logical thinking as they examine proofs. Congruency, similarity, properties of polygons, right triangles, and circles are studied. Geometry (H) – This course follows Algebra I. Postulates, theorems, definitions, and algebraic properties are combined with deductive reasoning and logical thinking to develop proofs. Emphasized are the concepts of congruency and similarity, the properties of particular polygons, the right triangle, and the circle. Algebra II (CP) – This course is offered to students who have successfully completed Algebra I and Geometry. Coursework builds directly upon the topics and concepts introduced in Algebra I. Students explore a variety of solution strategies for solving systems of equations, as well as linear, quadratic, rational, radical, and exponential equations. Students are required to interpret and solve application problems in each of these contexts. A working knowledge of the graphing calculator will be developed. Algebra II (H) – This course covers similar topics to Algebra II CP. In addition, students at the Honors level are expected to delve more deeply into each concept. Application problems have increased focus at the Honors level. More emphasis is placed on independent problem solving and mathematical justification of each step in students work. Pre-Calculus (CP) – This course is offered to students who have completed Algebra I and II and Geometry and may follow Advanced Algebra. The concepts and skills developed in Algebra II are reviewed and expanded. Topics covered include conic sections, logarithmic and exponential functions, the trigonometric functions, and sequences series and probability. Pre-Calculus (H) – This course lays the foundation for calculus and is designed for the student who has a solid background in Algebra II and Geometry. The course is a more advanced study of algebra integrated with coordinate geometry and emphasizes linear and quadratic functions and their graphs, the conic sections, logarithmic and exponential functions, the trigonometric functions, the concept of vectors, the study of limits, sequences, series, and probability. The approach stresses the understanding and application of concepts. Advanced Algebra – This course is offered to students who have completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II, and who wish to maintain proficiency in algebra skills in preparation for college mathematics. Topics include exponents, factoring, equation solving, rational expressions, radicals, quadratic equations, graphs of functions, conic sections, and trigonometric concepts. Calculus – This course introduces limits, differentiation, and integration of functions. Students will find and evaluate finite and infinite limits graphically, numerically and analytically. They will find deriviatives using a variety of methods including the Chain Rule and Implicit Differentiation. They will use the First Derivative Test and the Second Derivative Test to analyze and sketch functions. AP Calculus (AB) – AP Calculus (AB) is a college-level mathematics course intended to be challenging and demanding. A strong performance in Pre-Calculus is a prerequisite. Topics include: functions, graphs, limits, derivatives and integrals. College credit may be awarded to those students who are successful on the national AP exam given in May. AP Statistics – This course is offered on-line for an additional fee. AP Statistics data analysis is dependent on the use of technology. Students should have access to computers that include software capable of doing data analysis and students will be required to interpret output generated by statistical software programs. Students are not expected to learn how to use various statistical programs. College credit may be awarded to those students who are successful on the national AP exam given in May. Click HERE for Math Course Sequence with Prerequisites.

In grades 9 – 12, the science curriculum is incorporated into every level as a sequential, college preparatory program. It is the goal of this department to: (1) provide learning experiences which stress the importance of logical, qualitative, and quantitative thinking; (2) emphasize critical observation and analysis; and (3) promote a meaningful awareness of our environment. Laboratory activities and field investigations are designed to apply the scientific method in solving problems. A wide variety of opportunities encourages students to investigate and explore natural phenomena through independent and collective research. Biology (CP) – This laboratory course is designed to cover units on biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, classification, microorganisms, plants, invertebrates, vertebrates, human biology, and ecology. An emphasis is placed on human body systems. Lab and class activities are designed to involve students in the learning process, emphasizing critical thinking and analysis. Biology (H) – Honors biology is similar to Biology (CP), but will include additional topics, move at a more rapid pace, and will cover each topic in more depth. Prerequisites: 85 or higher in Algebra I (90 or higher in Pre-Algebra), and 85 or higher in Physical Science. AP Biology – This course covers the first year college biology curriculum and prepares students to take the CEEB AP Biology examination. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May. Emphasis is placed on developing the conceptual framework, knowledge and analytical skills necessary to understand the modern field of biology. The curriculum includes the study of molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological biology. All topics are supplemented with student laboratories that are completed during a full lab period scheduled each week in addition to the five regular class periods, as well as a weekend field trip to the coast in the spring. Students who elect to take this course should be successful independent learners. Chemistry (CP) – This course presents an investigation of the structure and composition of matter, as well as the changes that occur within matter. Topics include measurement, atoms, the periodic law, bonding, chemical compounds and reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities serve to reinforce and amplify each major concept. Chemistry (H) – This course provides a comprehensive exposure to a wide variety of general chemistry topics. The pace is faster than in the college preparatory course; more topics will be covered and in more depth. Through laboratory experiments, each student will manipulate various types of equipment and chemicals. Data will be collected and analyzed mathematically. Students will be responsible for learning some concepts independently. AP Chemistry – This course covers the standard first-year college chemistry curriculum and prepares students for the CEEB AP Chemistry examination. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May. The syllabus includes a more sophisticated treatment of many of the topics students learned in Chemistry Honors, along with additional topics. The textbooks used for AP Chemistry are those used by college chemistry majors. All topics are supplemented with student laboratories that are completed during a full lab period scheduled each week in addition to the five regular class periods. Students enrolling in this course should be successful independent learners. Prerequisites: 85 or higher in Chemistry (H), Geometry and Algebra II. Anatomy & Physiology – This laboratory course is offered as an elective for juniors or seniors. The course is designed to cover the structure of the human body (anatomy) and its functions (physiology). The course will attempt to help students understand the chemical and physical relationships of the human body. Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry. Astronomy – This full year course consists of the study of various celestial objects and their movements. One area is the study of the solar system (the night sky, the Copernican Revolution, the planets, how solar systems form, and the search for extraterrestrial life). Another area of study is stellar and galactic astronomy (radiation, spectroscopy, how stars form, star life and death, supernovas, neutron stars & black holes, cosmology and the early universe). Physics (CP) – Fundamental concepts of force, motion, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity and magnetism are explored. A conceptual understanding of physics is emphasized. All topics are supplemented with student laboratories. There is less emphasis on mathematical problem-solving in this course than in the honors-level course, and the pace is slightly slower. Physics (H) – Like the college prep course, Honors Physics provides an introduction to forces, motion, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity and magnetism. It is a mathematically based course emphasizing numerical problem-solving and laboratory experimentation. The pace is faster than in the college preparatory course; more topics will be covered and in more depth. AP Physics C: Mechanics and Electricity & Magnetism – This course covers the first year of calculus-based college physics and prepares students to take the CEEB AP Physics C: examinations: Mechanics and Electricity & Magnetism. Students are expected to take the AP exams in May. The course utilizes guided inquiry and student centered learning to foster the development of critical thinking skills. It expands upon material introduced in Physics(H), as well as introducing additional topics. Introductory differential and integral calculus are used throughout the course. (This course is offered based on student interest). Click HERE for Science Course Sequence with Prerequisites.

The Foreign Language department offers study in Latin or Spanish. The study of foreign language is an essential part of a student’s education. It enables the student to understand and appreciate other cultures in a shrinking world and contributes to overall intellectual development. In order to fulfill our graduation requirement, at least three years of foreign language must be completed during grades 9-12. Four years in the study of a language is strongly recommended for students seeking admission to competitive colleges. French I – The focus of the French I course is the development the students’ language skills through the study and use of vocabulary and grammar in culturally authentic situations. Class periods emphasize verbal activities supplemented by written exercises. Cultural material is integrated into the language learning process and reinforced by appropriate audio and visual aids. This class is offered to Juniors and Seniors only. Latin I – This course will introduce the student to the language and culture of Ancient Rome. Emphasis will be placed on grammar, vocabulary, and reading comprehension. Latin I stresses the fundamentals of Latin translation while incorporating the history, culture, and literature of Ancient Rome. The influence of Rome on our language and culture will be explored. Latin II – Second year Latin will continue the student’s studies of the Ancient language of Rome. Students will increase their vocabulary and understanding of Latin grammar. There will be continued emphasis on reading and comprehension and writing in Latin. This course will broaden the knowledge of Roman history and culture and continue to build English vocabulary with Latin derivatives. Latin III –Third year Latin will continue the student’s studies of the Ancient language of Rome. During the third year students will continue to increase their vocabulary and understanding of Latin grammar, as well as composition. Students will experience a range of authors from Classical to Medieval and will broaden their knowledge of Roman history and culture. English vocabulary and derivatives will be a continued focus of this course. Latin IV – Students will increase their vocabulary and will complete their study of grammar. This course will primarily focus on translation practice and composition, as well as exploring a number of authors, prose and poetry. This course will broaden the knowledge of Roman history and culture and continue to build English vocabulary with Latin derivatives. Latin V – Fifth year Latin will continue the student’s studies of the Ancient language of Rome. Students in Latin V will further explore and practice the application of Latin grammar through the intense study and translation of Roman Mythology. This course will primarily focus on translation and mythology, but will also include Roman history and culture. This course will broaden the knowledge of Roman mythology and history and continue to build English vocabulary with Latin derivatives. AP Latin – Students in the fourth and fifth year prepare for the Advanced Placement AP Latin: Vergil Exam through comprehensive practice in reading and writing comprehension. The course explores the literary works of Vergil and Caesar. As in all such courses at this level, the basic objective is progress in reading, translating, understanding, analyzing, and interpreting Latin. Students will also explore advanced concepts in meter and scansion, and figures of speech. Spanish I – The focus of elementary Spanish is a solid foundation on which to build. Students develop their language skills by studying and using vocabulary and grammar in culturally authentic situations. Class periods emphasize verbal activities supplemented by written exercises. Cultural material is integrated into the text and reinforced by appropriate audio and visual aids. The student is continually challenged to use Spanish in both speaking and writing Spanish II – The focus of the Spanish II class is to gain continued exposure to Hispanic cultures and an introduction to Hispanic literature. Students will master the use of all Spanish grammar skills (present, past, future, conditional, passive and subjunctive tenses) and continue expanding vocabulary in order to develop more complex conversational skills. The student is continually challenged to use Spanish in both speaking and writing Spanish III – The emphasis in this course is comprehension and expression, both oral and written. The study of grammar and the acquisition of vocabulary are continued. Students are placed in situations where they can use their language skills creatively and participate in progressively challenging conversations. They read short stories, articles, and plays and are provided with cultural or historical information appropriate to the readings. The class is progressively conducted in Spanish. Spanish IV (Honors) – Students learn through comprehensive practice in oral and reading comprehension. The continued refinement of written and oral expression, familiarity with Hispanic countries and culture and exposure to their literature, plus the acquisition of more sophisticated vocabulary and idioms are stressed. This course is conducted in Spanish. AP Spanish – Students in the fourth and fifth year prepare for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language Exam through comprehensive practice in oral and reading comprehension. The continued refinement of written and oral expression, familiarity with Hispanic countries’ culture and literature, plus the acquisition of more sophisticated vocabulary and idioms is stressed. 

This course is conducted in Spanish. In addition we offer alternative on-line courses through FuelEd and Virtual High School (VHS) for an added fee. These courses require approval from the Head of Upper School and Department Chair.

Elective courses in grades 9-12 are graded and recorded on the official transcript. Grades are included in the student’s overall grade point average on the transcript but, with the exception of History on Film, are not calculated in determining honor rolls, honor society, marshals, valedictorian, salutatorian, and academic probation. Advanced Art – This class is for students who want to improve their artistic abilities and discover new ones. All projects focus on the elements of art, the principles of design, and creativity. Advanced Art students are required to keep a sketchbook and are encouraged to keep a portfolio of their work. Ceramics I – All work is based on hand-building techniques: pinch, coil, and slab, with the exception of a small introduction to the wheel. Projects are designed to give the students direction, but enable them to interpret themes/techniques in their own way. This is a great class for students who like to work with their hands and don’t mind making a mess. Ceramics II – Is open to all students who have completed Ceramics I. Students will work primarily on the potter’s wheel. Types of pieces/topics include cylinders, pitchers, bowls, plates, platters, throwing off the hump, teapot sets, and throwing in sections. Ceramics II students are required to keep a sketchbook and create slides or a portfolio of their work. Eagle Publications is open to all students in grades 9 – 12. Students enrolled in this course will collaborate in the creation of the school yearbook. Students will explore photography, layout and design, and basic journalism skills such as interview techniques, factual and opinion-based writing, and editing. Teamwork is very important, as well as the ability to work with deadlines. Students will earn .5 fine arts credits per year. i-Mentor is open to all students in grades 9 – 12. Students interested in this course must get approval from the instructor. Students will go through the i-Mentor program on-line (at i-Safe.org) in a timely manner and became certified i-Safe Mentors (unless already certified). Once certified, they will schedule and teach Lower and Middle School classes about safety on the Internet using a program-provided curriculum guide. Students will be graded on preparation, knowledge of the i-Safe curriculum, and how responsibly they act in scheduling and executing classes with Lower and Middle school students. Independent Studio Art – is based on teacher recommendation for talent, work ethic, and behavior. This course is completely student centered. It is designed to provide the opportunity for students to focus on their interest and passions – allowing them to explore particular disciplines or styles in depth and develop high quality art which may be submitted for AP credit. Intramurals will satisfy the Physical Education graduation requirement and is open to all students in grades 9 – 12. This course will provide students with the opportunity to experience a variety of sports and games. Students will engage in a variety of health-enhancing activities that promote improvement in each health-related component of fitness: cardio-respiratory, muscular strength, flexibility, and body composition. Introduction to Programming in Java – Introduction to Programming in Java is an elective, year-long class that teaches students to program using Java. This course is an introduction to the ideas and methodologies of programming and is considered a Computer Science class. This class requires minimal studying and little time working on homework. It is meant to be a springboard to students who may be interested in perusing Computer Science courses in college but can easily be understood by anyone interested in technology. This course alternates each year with Web Design. Portfolio Studio Art is open to all students who have completed Ceramics I or Advanced Art. Students are accepted into the class based on teacher recommendation for talent, work ethic, and behavior. Students will complete a variety of assignments that will challenge them as artists and will encourage them to experiment with new media and techniques. Sports Medicine – This course will satisfy the Physical Education graduation requirement. Sports Medicine is a one-year program that is designed for students interested in fields such as athletic training, physical therapy, medicine, fitness, physiology of exercise, kinesiology, nutrition, and other sports medicine related fields. The course includes study and hands-on application in prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries, taping and wrapping of injuries, first aid/CPR, emergency procedures, and sports medicine careers. The course requires additional time working with the athletic teams during after school and evening hours. This course requires teacher approval. Varsity Band – Varsity Band is for the student who has a good performing ability and knowledge of an instrument. Upon recommendation of the band director, a student in 7th – 12th grade may enroll in Varsity Band. Varsity Chorus – The Varsity Chorus is Fayetteville Academy’s most advanced choir. The group will study many different varieties of music throughout the year and showcase their talent at several performances. Emphasis will be placed on reading music, understanding theory, developing listening skills, and learning about musical styles and composition. Whether you have been singing your whole life or are thinking about trying it out, you will enjoy this course. Web Design – Students will learn how to program a computer to display a web site using Hypertext Markup Language or HTML without the need for web design software. Students will be Level III web page designers, and, as time permits, will have an introduction to XHTML and XML web design programming. This course alternates each year with Introduction to JAVA Programming.

Upper School

 
Andrew “Drew” Wright
Head of Upper School
(910) 868-5131 ext. 3320